Be specific in your blog posts…

Be specific in your blog posts…

Searching for the term for the horizontal and vertical supporting strips between panes of glass (“muntins”) we came across a blog with a napkin sketch of a window. The author claims “It’s become .. the number one driver of traffic to this blog.”

Searches that bring users to websites often include esoteric terms and trade jargon, thus, if this were a post on a window company site, we would recommend mentioning any and all related words (mullions, rails, etc). Linking to other resources (in this case to a glossary of window anatomy for example), is also good for users and won’t hurt your search rankings. Precise terminology in your posts and pages make your site easier to define for search engines, and thus more likely to be served up in searches.

 

 

Why Facebook memes all look the same

Why Facebook memes all look the same

One of the reasons that Facebook memes have such a clichéd similarity and uniform typographic ugliness is that many of them are created with meme generators that use the typeface Impact — usually in all caps. The white type with black outline ensures sufficient contrast so that the type can be applied to any background. The templates offer users top and bottom message areas. Some meme generators allow users to upload their own images, but a surprising number of meme creators are unambitious enough to be satisfied with ready-to-use photos that are offered on these sites. The result is now ubiquitous on Facebook.

Graphic designers generally avoid outlining type, preferring more elegant solutions for a lack of contrast. All upper case and bold face messaging is also avoided by designers because upper and lower case, and lighter weight typeface are easier to read.

 

What makes white on the screen?

What makes white on the screen?

In a discussion of screen colors, a client asked us “how is white created?” In print, white is simply a lack of color, but on a computer monitor, the opposite is true.

Additive color on screens and monitors is created by mixing red, green and blue light — referred to as RGB. Two additive primary colors produce a secondary color: red and blue make magenta, red and green make yellow, blue and green make cyan. Where all three overlap we see white. Turn the colors off and you have black. The black type you are reading here is where the red, green and blue screen pixels are turned off. The white background is the result of all three colors on.

Raster (or Bitmap) vs Vector images

Raster (or bitmap) images are made of a grid of pixels — the smallest single components in a fixed-resolution image. Photographs are raster images. They are fixed resolution, so enlarged images will be blurry and pixelated, with a “stair-stepped” edge. Common raster file formats are jpg, gif, tiff, and png.

bitmap-raster-image

Vector images are created by a series of points that are joined using a mathematical formula that determines the vector between points. Vector images can be enlarged to any size with no loss of resolution. A common vector file format would be svg (scalable vector graphic). Adobe Illustrator files are typically vector, but they support raster images, just as Adobe Photoshop files now support vectors. Pdfs and eps files also support both vector and raster images, so asking for a pdf or an eps does not guarantee that you’ll end up with a vector file.

vector-scalable-image

You should have your logo in a vector format, so that it can be reproduced at any size. Ask your designer for a pdf and also an svg with type converted to paths (especially if your logo uses an unusual typestyle).